Karolyn Hart

Karolyn Hart is the President and Founder of InspireHUB Inc.

Recent Posts

3 Things You Can Do to Boost Communications with Non-Desk Employees | InspireHUB

Looking for ways to cultivate better communications with your non-desk personnel? They're often the members of your team most at risk of being left out of important conversations. These 3 "best practices" can be game-changers!


Three easy steps to kill a company culture. | InspireHUB

Healthy companies don't happen by accident. They're the result of an engaged leadership that creates a culture of care. Studies show that happy employees are more productive and their companies have a healthier bottom line.

So why does the Gallup poll tell us that nearly 70 percent of employees are actively disengaged?

Here are 3 things we get wrong and how to fix them ...


3 Tips to Avoid New Tech Abandonment | InspireHUB

Thousands of man-hours had been spent and hundreds of thousands of dollars on switching to the newest technology, only there was one significant and unforeseen challenge - no one was using it. Sound familiar? It happens all the time. In this case, the year was 1999 and unfortunately, since that time, I've seen this challenge happen repeatedly. If you ask people why a piece of new technology doesn't get adopted, you will usually get answers like “it didn't do what it promised,” “the people weren't properly trained,” or it just didn't work with our current processes.

Yet, in case after case, I've witnessed technology not be adopted that would have made a difference if it was used, the people were trained, and would have made current processes easier if implemented.

If you are a large business, you want to avoid a tug of war happening between you and your people as you desperately try to get the ROI out of your new tool. If you are a small business, any money put into a new tool that remains unused can be devastating.


We get Valentine’s Day so wrong in the workplace. | InspireHUB

Today, offices will have interruptions of deliveries. Receptionists become unsung heroes navigating deliveries.

Amidst the excitement will be employees who quietly observe and are suffering from loneliness.

In the healthiest corporate cultures we see teams for bonds of friendship that last for years even after they stop working together.

Does it really matter? One in four workers who felt lonely quit their jobs.


How to inspire your assembly line workers! | InspireHUB

“Hands up! baby, hands up! Gimme your heart! gimme, gimme your heart! Gimme gimme!” My favourite part of the day on the line had just arrived because Brenda had just put on our two o’clock song as we worked.  It always made me laugh because the line (which was made up entirely of women) would all pump their hands in the air at the same time every time the singer said: “Hands up!”

I’m from a manufacturing community where “working on the line” is a right of passage for many and I was no different.  As a teenager, my time spent here would be critical in shaping my views on work and also my character. The reality is that this small manufacturer was way ahead of their time.  I remember the leaders were very concerned with creating a positive culture. They worked hard to create a team environment and to protect the workplace.


Workplaces just replaced Neighborhoods and Places of Worship for our sense of community. What does that mean for companies?


In the most recent blog from Convene titled More People Feel a Sense of Belonging at Work Than Their Neighborhood or Place of Worship - they look at the recent statistics from EY on how people view the workplace:

According to a new study from professional services firm EY, more people get that sense of belonging from their jobs than any other source, outside of their own homes. 
The survey, which looked at    over 1,000 employed adults in the U.S. , found that 34% feel the greatest sense of belonging at work. While this is behind home (62%), it was significantly more than physical neighborhood (19%) and place of worship (17%).

The startling scheduling hack that can increase your productivity, morale, and innovation at the same time! | InspireHUB

When we started InspireHUB, we knew that a “start-up” culture meant that we could expect long hours and days.  We were no exception as our small team passionately pursued our dreams. As the leader of our team, I had only one rule and that was that I requested everyone take one day off every seven days.  (Back then, it wasn’t unusual for us to work weekends. Welcome to startup life.) Some followed it, some did not as they elected to try and get ahead of their work.

To say our team was “highly engaged” would be an understatement.  Requests from managers for staff to take extra time off (meaning working a normal work week like everyone else) was met with protest.  Our team wore their efforts like gamified badges even bragging about “starting second shifts” when the normal people of the world went home.  We were putting out huge amounts of code and work products. The team was passionately engaged. We were living the startup dream!

We were in serious trouble.


Why your MOM is the difference between success and failure with remote work.


INTRODUCTION:

Remote work is not a new phenomenon.  For thousands of years, leaders have been managing people that are distributed and there is a formula that predicts success.

  • How is that some rulers were able to lead their nation to great prosperity when others failed?
  • How did successful generals overseeing thousands of soldiers dispersed across great lands still manage to fulfill their missions successfully?
  • How do today's greatest leaders overseeing Fortune 500 companies with thousands of employees spread across different campuses still be profitable?

We are going to show you how your MOM is the biggest predictor of your ability to successfully oversee a remote workforce.

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